Re:Grub Burger Bar in Calgary, Alberta, Canada

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Re:Grub Burger Bar prides itself with using fresh ingredients that are sourced locally and building everything in their menu from scratch. Prices for their burgers range from CAD$7 to $15. These do not include any sides or drinks.

I ordered a Dude Ranch Burger made with house-baked fresh brioche buns, 6 oz Alberta grassfed beef, sunny side up egg, thick cut bacon, aged cheddar cheese, butter lettuce, tomato, and creamy bacon ranch for CAD$14. I would say the burger was alright. I feel it needs more sauce and the patty was not juicy enough for me. The sunny-side up egg was cooked to perfection, though!

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My brother ordered a Bison Bison for CAD$15 and is made with house-baked brioche buns, 6 oz Alberta bison, sauteed mushroom, torched asiago, caramelized onion, butter lettuce and creamy bacon ranch. According to my brother, he did not really like his burger and finds it bland. As for the bison, he said it tastes just like beef.

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My brother also ordered a large side of Dante’s Peak Fries for CAD$9. The fries are seasoned with hickory spice and topped with spicy dirty ketchup, parsley, and sunny-side egg.

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The main selling point for me to check out Re:Grub is their Instagram-worthy milkshakes. I ordered Camp Ranger which is a milkshake topped with a s’more and it costs CAD$7.

IMG_5971My brother ordered The Bomb, a milkshake topped with a donut, for CAD$6.

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To be honest, their milkshakes taste nothing out of the ordinary. It is a run of the mill milkshake and my favourite milkshake is still the ones from Peter’s Drive In. Yes, the presentation of Re:Grub’s milkshake makes it picture-perfect but at the end of the day, one would like to have a milkshake that hits the spot.

IMG_5969I would recommend to go to Re:Grub Burger Bar if only to go there to take pictures of their milkshakes and make your family and friends envy you because your Instagram account is so cool but do not go there if you are looking for a place to have a tasty burger that actually fills you up and a milkshake that is so thick and creamy.

IMG_5981How to order: When you get to Re:Grub Burger Bar, you place your order at the counter and then they will give you a table number. A server will then find a table for you and place your table number on it. After ordering, you will look for your table number, sit down, and wait for your order to be served.

IMG_5966Location: 625 11 Avenue South West, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Hours of Operation: M-T: 11-9, F:11-10, Sat:12-10, Sun:12-8

 

 

Travel Blogger of the Month: Jessica Shetler from Thrifty Traveler Tips

JuneJusz Travel‘s Travel Blogger of the Month for June is Jessica Shetler from Thrifty Traveler Tips!

Shetler started her blog in November of 2015 and is geared more towards budget travelers.

“My blog is Thrifty Traveler Tips and my goal is to encourage people to travel even on a tight budget. I share money saving tips, traveling tips, and how I manage to travel while being budget conscious,” she said. “There’s a little bit for every traveler on my blog such as road trips, group trips, packing tips, and products/companies I recommend. This gives you an awesome opportunity to find exactly what you are looking for and how to make it happen.”

Through her blog, Shetler was able to help others who may need help figuring out not only on the financial side of traveling but as well as planning the trip itself.

“The best part about being a travel blogger is helping others realize that traveling is easy to do if you plan correctly. I love helping people realize their dreams are attainable and encourage them to make them a reality,” said Shetler.

For the full interview with Jessica Shetler from Thrifty Traveler TipsThrifty Traveler Tips, continue reading below.

1. Tell us something about yourself not many people know about you?

I am someone who likes consistency and who is afraid of doing new things. Traveling is none of these things for me which used to make it hard for me to enjoy traveling and take risks. I’ve gotten so much better at being a yes man and it has granted me so many awesome opportunities and memories.

2. What is your blog called and what sets it apart from other travel blogs?

My blog is Thrifty Traveler Tips and my goal is to encourage people to travel even on a tight budget. I share money saving tips, traveling tips, and how I manage to travel while being budget conscious.

3. Why should people check out your travel blog?

There’s a little bit for every traveler on my blog such as road trips, group trips, packing tips, and products/companies I recommend. This gives you an awesome opportunity to find exactly what you are looking for and how to make it happen.

4. How long have you been blogging?

My blog has been up and running since mid November 2015.

a huge fish I caught in Austria
Jessica Shetler shows off a fish she caught in Austria.

5. Why did you decide you want to be a travel blogger?

I have always loved to write but never knew how to channel this passion. I also have had an obsession with traveling and expanding my horizons so being a travel blogger enabled me to do three things I love: write, travel, and help people achieve their dreams.

6. What is the hardest part about being a travel blogger?

The hardest part about being a travel blogger is deciding what to write about. I have so many topics that I want to tell people about but not enough time in the day to write them all.

7. And what is the best part about being a travel blogger?

The best part about being a travel blogger is helping others realize that traveling is easy to do if you plan correctly. I love helping people realize their dreams are attainable and encourage them to make them a reality.

8. What are the top three things you always bring with you in your travels?

I always bring my waterproof camera, an eye mask, and my favorite deodorant. I can take my camera anywhere to get awesome pictures, my eye mask lets me sleep or nap pretty much anywhere, and it’s hard and expensive to get deodorant on the road, especially one that you know will be reliable.

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Shetler at the Grand Canyon.

9. What is the craziest thing you’ve done while traveling?

The craziest thing I’ve ever done while traveling is whitewater rafting in the Austrian Tyrol. They made us practice saving each other by jumping off the side into the freezing water. We also braved swells 5 foot tall in our raft and got pummeled by water so hard we all had to get down into the boat. It was an amazing experience and I was so glad I did it!

10. Do you have another travel blogger you get inspiration from? Who is it and what is the name of their blog? How does this person inspire you?

My inspiration for travel blogging is Big World Small Pockets. They have a similar message to my own and I found them shortly after I started writing my own blog. I love that she has so many different places she has visited and that she is also budget conscious.

11. Share to us your best travel advice?

My favorite travel hack is getting wrinkles out of your clothes on the road. You need to hang your item of clothing over a bar in/near the shower, turn the shower on the hottest it will go, close all doors and windows in the bathroom and wait 3-5 minutes. Your shirt may be slightly damp at first but it will be completely wrinkle free!

12. Where was your last travel destination?

My last travel destination was a 28 day Contiki trip across Europe. My boyfriend and I visited 13 countries in this time with my favorites being Spain, Greece, Switzerland, and Austria. We also got to gamble in the Monte Carlo Casino, go to the top of Mount Titlis, eat lunch in Liechtenstein, and so many more adventures. It was adventure after adventure and I got to see awesome landmarks like the Eiffel Tower and the Colosseum. It was an unbelievable experience and I can’t wait to go on another one soon.

13. Where are you going next? What are you most looking forward to on this trip?

My next destination I hope to go on is to either Australia or Alaska. If I go to Australia, I want to see Kangaroos, snorkel, and see all of my friends from my Contiki trip. If I go to Alaska, I am so excited to see the Northern Lights, fish, and stay in an ice hotel if I can find one.

You can find Jessica Shetler on Facebook and Pinterest.

All photos (except for the first one) in this post are provided by Shetler.

Why we decided to get a Japan Rail Pass and why you should, too!

With only four full days in Japan, we originally planned to just explore Tokyo for two days, spend one day in Tokyo Disney Sea, and then go on a day trip to Kyoto.

With that travel itinerary in mind, we set out to do our research to find out how much a return train ticket would cost from Tokyo to Kyoto. We found out that a one-way ticket Tokyo to Kyoto costs about 13,080 yen or CAD$161.05 (as of June 20, 2016). If we buy two one-way tickets to make it a return trip, it would cost 26,160 yen or CAD$322.10 per person. This price is for a non-reserved seat on any of the shinkansen or bullet trains: Hikari, Kodama, or Nozomi. Of course, the prices go up for reserved seats. For reserved seats on either the Hikari or Kodama, it costs about 13,500 yen or CAD$166.23 one way so about 27,000 yen or CAD$332.46 both ways. As for a reserved seat on the fastest shinkansen which is the Nozomi train, the price is around 14,000 yen or CAD$172.38 one way and 28,000 yen or CAD$344.76 both ways.

We were taken aback with the prices so we did a little bit more research. Buying a Japan Rail (JR) Pass was never an option for us, at least in the beginning, because most people we’ve asked who’s been to Japan said it is not worth it to buy a JR Pass if we don’t really plan on taking the trains as much and since we are only going to be there for four days. They said we won’t get the bang for our buck. But after finding out how much a Tokyo-Kyoto return ticket costs, we looked into how much a JR Pass costs and actually considered it.

Our research brought us to a website and found out that an ordinary seven-day unlimited JR Pass costs CAD$346 and a green or first class JR Pass for seven days costs CAD$455. The ordinary seven day JR Pass is only CAD$23.90 more than the Tokyo-Kyoto return ticket on a non-reserved seat. To us, it made more sense to get a JR Pass especially since one can use a JR Pass in local trains in Tokyo and Kyoto as well as long as the trains are within the JR company. We will also be able to use the JR Pass for a train ride from Narita Airport to Tokyo and vice-versa using the Narita Express which saves us money. According to a friend, a train ride from Narita Airport to Tokyo using the Narita Express costs about CAD$20 to CAD$30. In short, having the JR Pass is actually the cheapest option for us and we would no longer need to buy individual train tickets which will also make our lives easier when travelling.

In the end, we opted for the ordinary JR Pass as we really could not afford to shell out another CAD$100 for the green or first class JR Pass. Based on our research, buying a green JR Pass gives a passenger more comfort, an oshibori or hot towel on board, as well as free drinks on some routes. Those do sound good but we can do without it. 🙂

We ordered two ordinary JR Passes online on a Thursday night and we received it on Friday before noon. It was sent to us via FedEx from France. Our order also came with a free Japan Railway map and timetables as well as a Japan by Train Travel Guide.

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Since we decided to get a JR Pass, we have made changes to our travel itinerary to make the most out of our JR Pass. Instead of spending two days in Tokyo, one day in Tokyo Disney Sea, and one day in Kyoto, we have decided to spend one day in Tokyo, one day in Kyoto, one day in Osaka, and one day in Tokyo Disney Sea. I know that means we will be rushing to see as much as we can in those four days but we thought it would be best for us to see a little bit of everything. This only means we need to go back to Japan to see more of the things we may miss on our trip in August.

Things you should know about the JR Pass:

  1. The JR Pass can only be used by foreigners who are visiting Japan as tourists and are staying for less than 90 days
  2. If you are thinking of getting a JR Pass make sure to buy it before you leave for Japan as you cannot buy it when you land in Japan
  3. Do not order a JR Pass more than three months away from your trip as you need to validate your JR Pass within three months of ordering it. You can validate your JR Pass at the airport when you land
  4. The JR Pass is not exclusive to trains as it can also be used on the JR Miyajima ferry

Expenses:

CAD$697 which includes two ordinary seven-day JR Pass, Japan by Train Travel Guide, and Japan Railway map and timetables.

Travel Video Diary: Exploring Reykjavik

My brother and I explored the city of Reykjavik on our first day in Iceland. We checked out the Kolaportið flea market and also the Hallgrímskirkja, the largest church in Iceland. This video shows our journey starting in Edmonton and flying to Keflavik! For more travel video diaries, subscribe to my Youtube channel. :) (This is a travel video diary for January 24, 2016)

A beginner’s guide to traveling on the open road

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Click on photo for credit.

After a while, we all get fed up with airport delays, long travel times, and nasty hotel stays. Eventually, we want the ability to go alone and explore the world at our own pace. The best way to do this in my mind is to get out there on the open road. I love a good road trip; the ability to go wherever I want and make my own memories based on where we end up. Still, there’s a lot to think about when it comes to road trips, so let’s make sure yours is a successful one.

Firstly, the most important thing that you’re going to want to think about is the vehicle you’re traveling in. It is safe to say that if you are planning to embark on a long road trip with an old and battered car, you’re not going to get very far. Instead, this might be the time to spend a little money and buy a purpose-built vehicle. Depending on what you want out of it, you might want to spend some money on an RV or a 4×4. This all depends on your budget, type of vehicle you’re after, and what your intentions are on the trip.

Being on the road means you’ve got to follow all the usual vehicle-related considerations as well. This is always important when operating a vehicle, especially if you’re driving something bulky. Make sure you feel comfortable with the vehicle before you take it on a long road trip. Don’t be afraid to have a few practice runs in a local, quiet area before embarking on your journey. Also, remember to maintain it as often as possible. Failing to do this could not only cause significant financial damage; it’ll put your safety at risk, too. Always carry emergency supplies including a spare tire and first aid kits. This is something that could save your life in some circumstances, so don’t neglect it!

Life on the open road comes with plenty of dangers as well as fun times! You’re going to be traveling for long periods of time, and tiredness will set in. If you’ve got something like a motorhome, use it to its full extent! Don’t neglect your body of the rest it needs. You’ll be putting yourself as well as everyone else in danger. Make sure you bring plenty of food and drink supplies with you on your trip as well. Sure, you can stop now and again to equip yourselves if you want to, but it’s still important to have supplies just in case you need them. You never know if you might get stuck somewhere and have to utilize those food supplies overnight. You’ll be grateful for them if that ever happens!

Above all, have fun. As long as you’re prepared in the right ways, you shouldn’t have anything to worry about. I love traveling on the open road without having to deal with planes, trains, and buses. I hope you get as much excitement out of it as I do!

Holiday Planning: Choosing The Best Transport Option

We’re so incredibly lucky to be alive in this day and age, and have a wealth of options at our disposal. These options extend to our transport methods too, and the means by which we get about when on holiday. But how do you choose which is most suitable for your particular trip?

Sometimes, getting the most out of a day trip or holiday involves mixing things up – a combination of bus options, planes, and cars. If you want to explore an entire country, this is absolutely essential – some areas are off limits to certain vehicles.

These are all decisions you need to make at the planning stage, so you are fully prepared. At a basic level, you need to figure out exactly what you want your holiday to be, then plan around that.

How many people are going?

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Click on photo for credit.

If it’s just you, or you and a partner, then your best option is flying to your destination. On the other hand, if you have a large group, it would be more cost-effective to rent a coach and board a ferry. Alternatively, if you’re staying on home soil, then a road trip in a vehicle big enough to accommodate you all would be best.

Weigh up the number of travelers with the cost of each method. If there is eight of you, then a small bit of money each would more than cover the cost of a coach. But the prices of flights stay the same!

Is it a mini-break or an extended break?

By the time you’ve gone through customs and security, and suffered any delays, flying to a mini break is all but pointless. You’d be far better off traveling by public transport if staying on home soil, or a ferry is you’re going international.

Fortunately, you have many different coach/bus options to take here. This is also useful if you have a large group, and can’t fit everyone in a car. Taking a ferry is a great way to make the transport feel like part of the holiday. You can soak up the beautiful horizons, and play through all the onboard entertainment. If you fly, the transport does not feel like part of the holiday at all.

But, if it’s an extended break, then flying is the way to go. You don’t need to make the transport feel like part of the holiday – you’ve got 5/7 days when you get there! Plus, you’ll arrive quicker and can begin the holiday festivities sooner.

Traveling your country on the cheap?

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Click on photo for credit.

Some people also call it ‘backpacking’ – touring the country, visiting free hostel after free hostel. It’s a great way to live, as no two days are the same. But it does cause problems in the transport department – how are you supposed to get about with minimal cash?

Fortunately, there is an answer. Most developed countries operate free transport systems that roam populated areas and town centers. These are usually dominated by the elderly, but there’s nothing to stop you, either!

So, in short, assess how much money you have to spend, the duration of your trip, and how many people are going. This way, you’ll be able to make the most of your trip away!

Archipelago Adventures: Beautiful Island Holidays You Should Check Out

When we go on holiday, we usually remain on the coast. We’ll go to capital cities or the main beaches. And sure, it’s nice to be able to say we went to Paris or New York City or Egypt. But not many of us seem to consider leaving the coast and hanging out on an island! Even rarer still are those of us who are willing to visit a whole cluster of them. Otherwise known, of course, as an archipelago!

When people do visit archipelagos, most of them seem to do so accidentally. For example, people will go to Stockholm because it’s the capital of Sweden. They usually don’t even know it’s an archipelago until they get there, and even then the islands are so big that it’s hard to tell!

But why is an archipelago holiday so good? Well, its uniqueness makes sure it has a lot going for it. There’s something strange and special about “island hopping”, as travelling around archipelagos is known.

So what are some of the most amazing archipelagos out there?

Zanzibar

Many people have heard about this place from that slightly risqué Tenacious D song. The lyric refers to having a beautiful dish imported from Zanzibar. And if you’d looked into the food industry of Zanzibar, you wouldn’t be surprised.

The Zanzibar Archipelago is also known as the Spice Islands, due to their successful spice exports and famous cooking. But amazing food isn’t all you can find on these islands. You can pet cheetahs at Cheetah’s Rock and hang out on the most beautiful beaches in Africa. There’s also one of the most famous coffee places in Africa: Jaw’s Corner. The black Zanzibar coffee (they don’t offer it any other way) is legendary across the entire continent. Find out more at ZanzibarResorts.com.

Maldives

Maldives is an archipelago that is its own country, way out in the Indian Ocean. There are about 300,000 inhabitants spread out across 185 of the 1,190 islands (!) that make up the Maldives. This place was basically unknown to tourists until the late seventies. This means that holiday-goers were missing out on this amazing place for centuries!

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Cocoa Island, Maldives. (For photo credit, click on the photo)

Far from the coast of any other country, the water surrounding the Maldives is beautiful and clean. That makes it the ideal location for one of its biggest tourist draws: scuba diving! And because there are so many islands, many of them very small, travellers can rent entire islands to themselves. It’s the ultimate in secluded luxury! Find out more at VisitMaldives.com.

Svalbard

Had enough of all that sun? Want something really unique, maybe even extreme? If you’re not afraid of an arctic expedition, then you may want to check out Svalbard. It’s a Norwegian territory found in the Arctic Ocean.

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Ice cave in Svalbard. (For photo credit, click on the photo)

This is an archipelago of which 60% is covered in glaciers. The majority of these islands are national parks that are mostly untouched by humans. Arctic foxes, reindeer and polar bears roam the land freely. They’re mostly undisturbed by Svalbard’s 2600 inhabitants. It may not sound very tourist-friendly, but hundreds of people visit this place from all over the world every year. If you want less sun and more adventure in your holiday, this could be the place for you. Find out more at https://Svalbard.NordicVisitor.com/.

Travel Bloggers of the Month: Stefan and Sebastien

Travel Bloggers of the Month

Jusz Travel is putting the spotlight on Sebastien and Stefan from Nomadic Boys as Travel Bloggers of the Month! I love these two because I find the photos on their blog to be hilarious and their articles not only helpful but also entertaining.

S and S is a gay couple from Europe who found themselves adventuring in Asia.

“We quit our jobs and London life in June 2014 to eat our way through Asia and plan to make travelling a long-term lifestyle,” said Stefan Arestis. “We started Nomadic Boys in November 2013 as a platform to record our travel experiences and make fun of ourselves as we ate our way around Asia. Nomadic Boys has since translated into a brand that has grown exponentially over the past year, particularly among the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) community.”

The Nomadic Boys has earned the trust of their readers due to their consistent hard work in providing travel articles with a “touch of humour”.

“We write destination guides, food and adventure stories always with a touch of humour. We have a strong relationship with our followers who trust our opinion and follow our travels to find inspiration for their future journeys,” said Arestis. “The main two things we both love are picking up recipes from each country we visit and trying to meet local gays and gain their point of view of the gay scene.”

For the full interview with Sebastien and Stefan from Nomadic Boys, continue reading below.

03 Stefan and Sebastien at the Puu Jih Syh Temple, Sandakan, Sabah, Malaysia Borneo, August 2015
In August 2015, Stefan and Sebastien visited the Puu Jih Syh Temple in Sandakan, Sabah, Malaysia Borneo.

1. Tell us something about yourself not many people know about you?

We are gay couple, Stefan and Sebastien. We quit our jobs and London life in June 2014 to eat our way through Asia and plan to make travelling a long-term lifestyle.

Stefan, 33 is a former lawyer, of Greek Cypriot origin, born and raised in London. Sebastien, 33, is an IT geek, originally from France but moved to London to work in the finance industry. London is where we met.
2. What is your blog called and what sets it apart from other travel blogs?

Our blog is Nomadic Boys. We started Nomadic Boys in November 2013 as a platform to record our travel experiences and make fun of ourselves as we ate our way around Asia.

Nomadic Boys has since translated into a brand that has grown exponentially over the past year, particularly among the LGBT community.
3. Why should people check out your travel blog?

We write destination guides, food and adventure stories, always with a touch of humour.

We have a strong relationship with our followers who trust our opinion and follow our travels to find inspiration for their future journeys.

08 Learning to work as a team. Inle Lake, Myanmar, January 2015
The Nomadic Boys at Inle Lake in Myanmar in January 2015.

4. How long have you been blogging?

Since November 2013.
5. Why did you decide you want to be a travel blogger?

Travelling and cooking were the two things we had in common from the outset. Sebastien was on the verge of leaving London and Stefan had hit a lull in his legal career and was looking for something new. We talked about moving to new places long term and earning money along the way to fund this and to make long-term travelling a new lifestyle/career.

In around 2012, we agreed to go for it and start by eating our way through Asia. So, we started planning and saving up and set 2014 as the year we would be financially ready to leave London.

We set up the blog before we left London in June 2014 and has become our baby.
6. What is the hardest part about being a travel blogger?

We learnt that you can’t just keep travelling as you need time to stop and work on the blog. This is actually a good thing. We have to travel slowly, factoring many “admin days” to just work on the blog and planning ahead. The blog has been a welcome weight on our shoulders through our travels that keeps us on our toes, just like our baby, it’s our project, our baby, but constantly needs to be mothered.

14 Do we look like brothers!! Posing at the City Palace of Jaipur, India, October 2014
The couple posing at the City Palace of Jaipur, India in October 2014.

7. And what is the best part about being a travel blogger?
The blog has been an excellent way to keep a record of our travels. It’s great because it forces us to be more involved with our travels, such as what we are eating, when and why was a particular building built and making a strong effort to meet locals.

The main two things we both love are picking up recipes from each country we visit and trying to meet local gays and gain their point of view of the gay scene.
8. What are the top three things you always bring with you in your travels?

The nature of travelling has really changed over the past decade. In Stefan’s first backpacking trip to South America in 2005, there was no blog, digital camera, smart phone, etc… Now however:

– Laptop: in this day and age you can’t be a successful travel blogger without a decent laptop to work on. Stefan adores his MacBook Air and Apple-hating Seb gets anything non apple.

– Smart phone: this goes hand in hand with the nature of travel blogging and needing to keep social media active and engaged. Apps like Instagram only work on smart phones. Googlemaps has also been a god send in our travels. Stefan’s an Apple geek, Seb on the other hand hates everything about Apple and get whatever Samsung releases.

– Camera: a decent camera to take high quality photos and videos is a must for our blog posts and any sponsored projects we undertake. We swear by our Panasonic TZ60. This is the only piece of technology we agree on and is our other baby.

10 Striving to make this a long term lifestyle. Sebastien struggling with the altitude at 5,000 metres during our Annapurna Circuit trek in Nepal, September 2014
Sebastien struggling with the altitude at 5,000 metres during the Nomadic Boys’ Annapurna Circuit trek in Nepal in September 2014.

9. What is the craziest thing you’ve done while traveling?

We did the Annapurna Circuit in Nepal, which was a two-week trek around the Annapurna Himalaya mountain range, culminating at Thorong La Pass at 5,416 metres high.

This trek really tested our limits, particularly the effect of the high altitudes where breathing problems and headaches started to kick in. Not to mention the freezing cold. Absolutely loved it though and remains one of the highlights of our trip to Asia.

Oh and trying balut in the Philippines. Not that was really testing our limits!!
10. Do you have another travel blogger you get inspiration from? Who is it and what is the name of their blog? (include link) How does this person inspire you?

When we first hatched the idea to make travel a long term lifestyle, Stefan Google searched what other former lawyers did with themselves and stumbled upon Jodi Ettenberg of Legal Nomads.

At the time, she happened to be in London and we met up with her. My god she was extremely inspiring and to this day we see her as the Mama of our travel blogging experience. We were delighted to meet her again recently at TBEX Asia in Bangkok. She’s huge of course, very popular blogger with a massive reputation, yet despite this, she remains so humble and still the endearing sweet person we met in London all those years ago.

11. Share to us your favourite travel hack?

Instead of booking a hotel via Booking.com or Agoda, contact the hotel directly and offer to book with them instead of the third parties. They will usually give you a discount because this will save them paying out the commission they will have to pay, which is passed on to the customer.

27 Spa lovers ritual at The Four Seasons, Langkawi island in Malaysia, July 2015
Spa lovers ritual at The Four Seasons, Langkawi island in Malaysia in July 2015.

12. Where was your last travel destination? Tell us all about it!

We spent 17 months eating our way around Asia and now we’re back home for Christmas in cold Europe, my god do we miss it! Nepal and Mongolia were our highlights for scenery, Sri Lanka and Borneo for wildlife and the Philippines and Indonesia had the best beaches.

Our heart is still in Thailand, which has it all. Bangkok is an excellent base for gay travelers, affordable, a huge gay scene around Silom Soi 4 and 6 and some of the best food in the world.
13. Where are you going next? What are you most looking forward to on this trip?

We plan to visit Latin America in 2016 and possibly North America. We’re still working on the planning but this is what we’re aiming for. Unlike Asia, the Americas are far more developed with regards to their gay laws, so will have a lot more to offer for the gay traveler.

The Nomadic Boys are all over the internet! You can find them on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Youtube, and Pinterest!

All photos in this post are provided by the Nomadic Boys.

12 Another food fight about to break out, Sandakan, Malaysia Borneo, August 2015
The couple about to have a food fight in Sandakan, Malaysia Borneo in August 2015.

Street Art Snaps: Reykjavik

Location: Reykjavik, Iceland

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Reykjavik is a small city, so getting around by foot is tolerable and stumbling upon street art is no surprise. I think these photos show how much talent there is in Reykjavik! I mean look at that elephant!! And that lion! And that lady with the mask! Some of their street art also serves a purpose. For example, that street art depicting how to tie a tie. 🙂1472_10153940420768217_5255174040938595494_n 12439539_10153940421193217_2314758573238725936_n 12524069_10153940420913217_797982337095402320_n 12549066_10153940422563217_5065288815221071822_n 12552920_10153942769978217_4113997145013499478_n 12592293_10153940402398217_4387215599287792945_n 12592774_10153940400603217_3758321048029710072_n 12631301_10153940410823217_819838774886895922_n 12631492_10153940402058217_2889146919994954195_n 12642803_10153942773408217_8119511629398239035_n 12642856_10153940400153217_9175605742441962617_n 12642877_10153940420808217_9103598704874623680_n 12644734_10153942769823217_2452456034909963877_n

Budget Breakdown for My Four-Day Trip to Iceland in January

 

BUDGETThis is a complete budget breakdown of my trip to Iceland for four days from January 24 to 27, 2016.

Iceland’s currency is called the Icelandic Króna or ISK. Based on my research, “the Nordic currencies such as the Danish krone, Swedish krona and Norwegian krone that participated in the historical Scandinavian Monetary Union, the name króna meaning crown comes from the Latin word corona ‘crown’.”

Before leaving for Iceland, here is a breakdown of my expenses:

CAD$659 – Edmonton, Canada to Keflavik, Iceland roundtrip flights and three nights accommodation (no breakfast included) at Hotel Reykjavik Natura
CAD$44 – Roundtrip airport transfer with Flybus
CAD$256 – Four-hour snorkel tour at Silfra with Iceland Excursions including hotel pick up and drop off
CAD$307 – 12-hour glacier hike and northern lights tour with Icelandic Mountain Guides including hotel pick up and drop off
CAD$96 – Blue Lagoon admission including hotel pick up and drop off
Total: CAD$1,362

Currency conversion: CAD$1 = 95.97ISK (As of May 12, 2016)

January 24 Daily total: CAD$96.38 (9,250 ISK)

CAD$17.71 breakfast buffet at KEX Hostel (1,700 ISK)
CAD$16.57 food-pasalubong (1,590 ISK)
CAD$4.17 toothpaste and postcard (400 ISK)
CAD$3.13 two postcards (300 ISK)
CAD$9.38 Hallgrimskirkja entrance fee (900 ISK)
CAD$38.87 dinner at Roadhouse: donut burger and brownie milkshake (3,730 ISK)
CAD$6.56 bottled water (630 ISK)

January 25 Daily total: CAD$96.78 (9,288 ISK)

CAD$8.74 beer (839 ISK)
CAD$40.43 dinner at Laundromat Cafe (3,880 ISK)
CAD$22.91 wool socks (2,199 ISK)
CAD$9.90 two pretzels and one madeleine at Sandholt Bakery (950 ISK)
CAD$14.80 noodle soup with chicken at the Noodle Station. It was sweet and very vinegary. They will ask if you want it spicy. I wanted beef but they ran out. It was good but not the best I had. (1,420 ISK)

January 26 Daily total: CAD$30.22 (2,900 ISK)

CAD$30.22 breakfast at Hotel Natura’s Satt (2,900 ISK)

January 27 Daily total: CAD$118.32 (11,355 ISK)

CAD$6.25 bag (600 ISK)
CAD$24.28 lunch at airport (2,330 ISK)
CAD$63.46 books (6,090 ISK)
CAD$20.16 chocolate and mini Brennivin (1,935 ISK)
CAD$4.17 magnet (400 ISK)

The grand total of my expenses for my Iceland trip for four days is CAD$1,703.70. Looking back at it now, I am so surprised that my Iceland trip is SOOOOO CHEAP! I mean if we only take into account the flights, hotel, food for four days without doing any of those tours or buying any unnecessary trip souvenirs, we can get by with spending only about CAD$850 for four days!!

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